Early-Stage Math And Upstream Expectations

For early-stage startups with the luxury to have this problem, a common topic that comes up in conversation lately is: “Well, how much should we raise?” I have a hard time answering that question with a specific number because everything is so case dependent and I don’t usually have a good sense of what the founders have in mind for long-term planning. And, even though I have my own experience to draw from, I’m not sure it’s applicable or proper to extrapolate from. So, in the absence of that, I end up stitching together three separate posts from investors who have way more experience than me:

What A CEO Does.” In this post, there are three jobs for the CEO, one of which is he/she “makes sure there’s always enough cash in the bank.” Sounds obvious, but worth repeating and adds a solid foundation.

Always Have 18 Months Of Cash In The Bank.” The logic of why is explained in the post, and it seems like a good rule of thumb.

And, finally, there was a @pmarca twitter thread about this. I believe some people drew the wrong conclusion from that online discussion, getting hung up on the name of a round (seed vs A, etc.). All that crap is semantic. I tried to write about what it really means here. Essentially, if an early-stage startup has ended up raising around $3m or more, an investor like Marc Andreessen (and maybe this shifts with each person) will expect that startup to have even more evidence of usage, traction, and/or revenues. Those are the expectation of a big top tier fund, and in discussions with folks at those places, they all agreed.

I have noticed in the past few weeks that founders I’m talking to are now more aware of this. I didn’t connect these dots until a few days ago, so it was helpful to go through these conversations. One founder, for instance, wanted to raise $1.2M. He blew by that, and then decided to go up to $1.75M if high-value or strategics came in. But, he asked me, “What should I stop at?” He could’ve kept going. It can be tempting. But, I didn’t have a good answer for him…so, I wrote this post instead.

Haystack is written by Semil Shah, and is published under a Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license. Copyright © 2018 Semil Shah.

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